• The Other Afghan Women

    by Anand Gopal
    In this appalling overview of civilian deaths from the Afghan War, Gopal looks to open our eyes to the prejudices that we may have previously held. Many, many civilians, primarily in rural areas, lost their lives, their families, and their livelihoods in the struggle between the Taliban and the American and NATO-backed armies. Gopal hopes to tell their stories.
    6 days ago

  • 5.0/5
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    3

  • The Lessons of Defeat in Afghanistan

    by Steve Coll
    Comment: Coll reviews America's departure from Afghanistan and what that means for the international community.
    7 days ago

  • 2.0/5
    1
    5

  • When the Raids Came

    by Andrew Quilty
    Before the removal of all American troops from Afghanistan, Quilty traveled to Wardak, a rural town in the country, to interview a family that had undergone an infamous "night raid." Multiple family members were killed and their house was left in ruins, even though they appeared to simply be civilians.
    13 days ago

  • 4.5/5
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    2

  • America Was Eager for Chinese Immigrants. What Happened?

    by Michael Luo
    Looks reviews two books: “The Chinese Question” (Norton) by Mae Ngai and “The Chinese Must Go” (Harvard) by Beth Lew-Williams. He outlines the history of Chinese immigration in America, mainly focuses on the California Gold Rush and the years following it.
    15 days ago

  • 3.5/5
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    3

  • In the Dark

    by Aldous Huxley
    Harper's reprinted this excerpt from Huxley's full essay, "Notes on Propaganda" published in this same magazine in 1936, on the cusp of the Second World War.
    18 days ago

  • 4.5/5
    1
    7

  • Death Valley

    by Hari Kunzru
    Kunzru, a British citizen, was traveling the United States at the time of 9/11. He reflects on his experiences and memories of that time.
    18 days ago

  • 2.5/5
    1
    4

  • Invasion of the Robot Umpires

    by Zach Helfand
    Helfand investigates the use of "robo-umpires" in the minor leagues, which are being tested and soon to be brought up to the majors. Some challenge this change, while others believe it's merely an extension of the automation and statistics that is already becoming a crucial part of the game.
    20 days ago

  • 4.0/5
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    4

  • Interview: How China Avoided a Soviet-Style Collapse

    by Isabella Weber interviewed by Daniel Zamora
    Zamora and Weber try to understand why China didn't undergo a similar collapse as the Soviet Union when integrating into global markets just decades ago. Weber believes that Russia's unwavering "shock therapy," where prices were liberalized essentially overnight, was much more dangerous than China's "dual path" approach.
    22 days ago

  • 4.8/5
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    6

  • Disorganized Democracy

    by Chris Maisano
    Maisano reviews Göran Therborn’s new collection of essays, "Inequality and the Labyrinths of Democracy." Maisano focuses on the aspects of the "tertiary" or service sector, saying that working-class politics must change to account for the clear deindustrialization of the workforce.
    22 days ago

  • 4.5/5
    1
    25

  • Bad News: Selling the story of disinformation

    by Joseph Bernstein
    Bernstein posits a crucial theory on "disinformation": could it be a centrist reaction to the polarization of politics and an attempt to hold on to the power that is slipping away? He writes, "'Misinformation' and 'disinformation' are used casually and interchangeably to refer to an enormous range of content, ranging from well-worn scams to viral news aggregation; from foreign-intelligence operations to trolling; from opposition research to harassment. In their crudest use, the terms are simply jargon for 'things I disagree with.'"
    23 days ago

  • 5.0/5
    1
    34

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