• Yuppie Misandry

    by Liza Featherstone
    Featherstone cites Alexandra Kollantie, a Bolshevik leader and writer, in identifying the proliferation of "elite feminism" in today's culture. Featherstone quotes that "the woman and her male comrade are enslaved by the same social conditions" and concludes for herself that "casting men as an additional class enemy drastically divides and reduces our numbers, and we will never win that way."
    4 days ago

  • 4.5/5
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  • The Left Turn

    by Andrew Marantz
    Whether from the Left or the Right, the general consensus is that the neoliberal era is coming to and end. Marantz reviews the realignment, or at least the attempt to do so, of the Democratic Party, specifically from the actions of the Justice Democrats. Although many may disagree with the changes in current politics, Marantz writes "Such seismic shifts appear to happen, on average, once a generation. If this pattern holds, then we're just about due for another one."
    4 days ago

  • 4.0/5
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  • Take Me to Your Leader: The Rot of the American Ruling Class

    by Doug Henwood
    Henwood gives us a history of the American "ruling class" and tries to understand its composition in the current moment. He writes, "I'd say the ruling class consists of a politically engaged capitalist class, operating through lobbying groups, financial support for politicians, think tanks, and publicity, that meshes with a senior political class that directs the machinery of the state."
    4 days ago

  • 4.0/5
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  • Stealth Mode

    by Adam Entous
    Entous looks into how the "Havana Syndrome," a mysterious ailment that made American foreign diplomats have terrible headaches and confusion, spread to the White House. "Top officials in both the Trump and Biden Administrations privately suspect that Russia is responsible" and has "been aiming microwave-radiation devices at U.S. officials to collect intelligence from their computers and cell phones."
    6 days ago

  • 3.0/5
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    7

  • A, S, D, F

    by Said Sayrafiezadeh
    A secretary at a small art studio in Aspen focused on Abstract Expressionism goes throughout his job disappointed with it, but also scared that it'll close down at any moment and he'll be out of a job. His boss asks him to write letters to potential buyers on an old typewriter, refusing to let him use the computer. He is bitter at this restriction, yet also manages to find solace in it and the odd quirks of his job.
    6 days ago

  • 4.5/5
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    10

  • The U.F.O. Papers

    by Gideon Lewis-Kraus
    The Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force was formally announced in the summer of 2020. They were tasked to "gather and analyze data from disparate agencies" and release a report in June 2021. Believers in U.F.O.s expected a bombshell report, while critics argued that it was a vastly inappropriate and negligent use of government funds. Lewis-Kraus tries to look at both sides of the story and remove the stigma around U.F.O.s that has cropped up in recent years.
    9 days ago

  • 3.5/5
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    11

  • Growing It Back

    by Matthew Hutson
    Hutson's piece is both a biography of a genius and an insightful looking at a curious phenomena: biological regeneration. Michael Levin, a development biologist, "argues that the cells in our bodies use bioelectricity to communicate and to make decisions among themselves about what they will become." That questions the belief that "genes are everything" and instead proposes that they work together to form our bodies.
    9 days ago

  • 5.0/5
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  • Separation Anxiety

    by Sam Knight
    Knight reviews both the rise of Nicola Sturgeon and the Scottish National Party as the majority in the Scottish parliament. He writes that "Sturgeon embodies an apparent oxymoron: a left-of-center-nationalist." Support for Scottish independence "reached fifty-eight per cent" in the fall of 2020, and Sturgeon's approval rating during the pandemic and the travails of Brexit indicate that this support may only increase.
    9 days ago

  • 4.0/5
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  • Whose Side is Kavanaugh On?

    by McKay Coppins
    Although there have been a number of controversial political figures in the past couple years, Brett Kavanaugh remains high on the list. But Coppins reveals in this biography that before his nomination and hearings for the Supreme Court and his "descent into villainy that fall," Kavanaugh was an incredibly respected judge and across both sides of the isle and in his local community. Coppins looks at how the public perspective of him changed and questions how that might affect his future decisions in the Court.
    14 days ago

  • 4.3/5
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  • The War on Nostalgia

    by Clint Smith
    Smith travels to monuments across the southern United States commemorating the Civil War. He attends a demonstration of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and contemplates the relationship of nostalgia and historical truth in the "myth of the Lost Cause." He writes that "it is not a public story we all share, but an intimate one, passed down like an heirloom, that shapes [White Southerners'] sense of who they are."
    14 days ago

  • 4.5/5
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